5 minutes with Di Smyth and Clare Strand

“The show is very much grounded in Surrealist themes – specifically with movement, machinery, dust, frottage, sex and chance”

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“But Clare Strand is not like other photographers, and there is one thing that marks her out as one of the UK’s most exciting practitioners in photography today – she is an illusionist” Review by Barry W Hughes for SMBH 

“But Clare Strand is not like other photographers, and there is one thing that marks her out as one of the UK’s most exciting practitioners in photography today – she is an illusionist” Review by Barry W Hughes for SMBH 

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“The space felt more like a factory of thought, with the spectator experiencing the inner cogs of a photographer’s imagination. The jarring and challenging relationship Strand has with the medium being laid bare for us to see” Review by Harry Rose, Darwin Magazine.

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Material, 2015
Monochrome Film incased in an aluminium box with peephole

Material (Still), looking through the Peephole.

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Retouch  are hand printed, fibre-based monochrome photographic prints made using an extreme retouching technique - a hammer and metal punches. 

Retouch  are hand printed, fibre-based monochrome photographic prints made using an extreme retouching technique - a hammer and metal punches. 

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Happenstance Generator (from above).

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Output from Entropy Pendulum day 22.

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 Rubbings, are photographed sections of trees, at points of divergence.

 Rubbings, are photographed sections of trees, at points of divergence.

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Work, Rest and Play, Shenzhen Oct-Loft China and Minsheng Art Museum, Shanghai. Curated by The Photographers' Gallery. 9th May -23rd August 2015

Gone Astray Portraits by Clare Strand (pictured). Work, Rest, Play features over 400 images by thirty-eight acclaimed photographers and artists, presents a broad range of photographic practices, reflects upon the changing face of British culture over the last 50 years. The Gone Astray Portraits, (2002-3), may appear to faithfully reference the conventions of 19th century street portraiture yet on closer inspection the sitters are not regular street folk but a pre-selected cast, dressed by the photographer, and assigned props. The title, taken from Charles Dickens’ novella Gone Astray, 1853, ruminates on being lost in the city of London and the drama and pretense of the urban street. 

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